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Record Id: 33987 Image No: GI/GI_006  
Image Link: View full size image (Average file size 500 KB, this may take some time to download).
Title: Lunatic asylum at the Whau, Auckland. Block plan showing drainage and water supply
Architect: Beatson, Charles E.
Contributors: Public Works Department
Date: 1886
Relation: Is part of the Public Works Department collection, Whau lunatic asylum project
Place: Oceania | New Zealand | North Island | Auckland Region | Auckland City | Point Chevalier | Carrington Road
Subjects: Architecture New Zealand | Architecture Designs and Plans | Historic Buildings
Building: Unitec | Carrington Hospital | Whau Lunatic Asylum
Item Description: Architecture designs and plans 66.6 x 95.8 cm. 19th century.
Project Description:

Originally known as the Lunatic Asylum or the 'Whau' the hospital was built under the supervision of James Wrigley in 1865 using plans drawn in England. The neoclassical facade incorporates bricks produced on the site and at Dr Pollen's brickyards in Avondale and has polychromatic detailing.

One of the largest public buildings in the colony at the time of construction, it was gutted by fire in 1877. Philip Herapath, working from the original drawings, supervised the reconstruction. It has had numerous additions since then and all have been largely in keeping with the design of the original main block.

In July 1992 the Auckland Area Health Board closed Carrington Hospital and it was offered for sale. It was bought by Carrington Polytec and after considerable refurbishment opened in October 1994 as the UNITEC school of architecture and design.

(Information sourced from: Historic Auckland http://www.historic-auckland.org.nz/place_article.php?article=120)

Location: Architecture Archive